Turning With Your Mill - This Accessory Adds Turning to Your 770 or 1100

Have you ever wanted to add a lathe to your shop, but just didn’t have the room?

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Adding a New Element of Automation to Our 15L Slant-PRO Lathe

In the world of CNC, automation is important. Using CNC, we can make all sorts of products, widgets, and parts quickly and consistently, but we can streamline that process even more by adding automation. While CNC allows the production of complex parts and organic shapes with your mill or lathe, it also gives you the ability to cut parts without touching the machine. Hit Cycle Start and your part(s) are ready in short order. On a mill equipped with an automatic tool changer, you can set up your workholding to produce a large number of parts without having to go back to your machine. But on a lathe with a turret or gang tooling, that automation is restricted by your stock, unless you have a method to pull more raw material into the machine between cycles. We’ve addressed both issues with our new Automatic Collet Closer for the 15L Slant-PRO lathe, and a self-adjusting bar puller! A traditional lathe collet closer is a lever-actuated unit which you use to manually open and close the collet mechanism holding your work. Our automatic collet closer is controlled through the PathPilot interface, which means the control system can open and close the collet for you. During a program, you can add a program stop to pause the lathe and switch out stock, or switch sides of the stock for different ops. With this automatic collet closer system, adjusting clamping pressure becomes much easier, too. By simply adjusting the regulator, you can refine the clamping pressure on your part and keep it consistent. To fully automate a program, add a bar puller. With a bar puller, you can add an operation in your program to cut off a part, grab the stock, pull it to a designated length, and continue cutting parts. Not only does this allow you to make more parts without ever touching the machine, it can improve your cycle times. Save production time and improve repeatability with the Automatic Collet Closer for 15L Slant-PRO lathe paired with a bar puller. Both are available now!

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Cutting Threads with Your Mill

[youtube]2DoLF0L2Sa0[/youtube] Cutting threads is an important element of machining. Even if you aren’t into making your own, custom-sized threads, it still helps to know how to create them. We’ve seen customers get pretty creative with their machines and cutting methods, but with a Tormach mill, there are three main ways to cut threads.

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Know Your Cutting Tools: Lathe Tooling Designations

[youtube]Wp09EXLa4xw[/youtube] Whether you’re new to the world of turning or you’ve been using a lathe for years, it’s important to know your tools and the best way to use them. Lathe tooling designations are there to help, but they can be just as confusing as the tools themselves. [wpdm_package id='13034'] Every lathe tool has an inscribed or printed designation. This system just looks like a bunch of random digits and letters, unless you know what you’re looking at. Each letter and number in the tooling designation is a reference to various features of your tools or inserts – things like insert shape, hand of the tool, and the insert inscribe circle. Read: 3 Things to Remember Before You Start Turning All of these numbers and letters can be a bit confusing, so Tormach has a document that charts out all the different designations within the uniform system. Check out the official document. Use this info to make sure you pick out the best tools for your lathe jobs and make your turning even better!

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Workholding of the Month: Turret or Gang Tooling?

This is one of the many topics that seems to engender religious fervor from one side versus the other. I personally went through several hundred online articles and correspondences I’ve had with our G-Wizard customers about this choice. For my upcoming Tormach CNC Lathe, I initially had ordered it set up for gang tooling based on my needs, but then hastily added a turret after several conversations with the turret aficionados, just so I could write about and compare the two more fully, and I’m glad I did. Let’s start with some definitions and the basic conclusion I reached after all these conversations and research, and then dive into the myriad details.

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3 Things to Remember Before You Start Turning

If you’re already using a mill, a natural extension of your shop would be to add turning capabilities with a lathe. CNC milling and CNC lathe work are quite similar, but there are some glaring differences that are easy to miss if you’re new to turning.

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