How to Do Routine Maintenance on Your CNC Machine

Machine maintenance can make all the difference in the world inside your shop. Whether you’re talking about HVAC, hand tools, or machine tools, keeping your shop clean and maintained will not only make things last longer, but it will also help you become/stay efficient.

Read More...

Don’t Gamble With Your Tools: Use Rust Protection

It’s a real heartbreaker to pull out a tool you haven’t looked at in a while and discover it has rust. Nasty stuff. I live within sight of the ocean, so my shop is particularly susceptible. That’s made me a believer in rust protection. Once rust sets in, we can clean it, but better if you never give it a toehold.

Read More...

Coolant and Cutting Tools: How to Choose the Right System for the Job

Selecting the right coolant for the job may seem straight forward, but there had to be a reason there are so many options, so I started digging around. Here’s what I learned:

Read More...

PCNC in the Performance Racing Industry: Weekend Racer Turned Fabricator

Mechanical engineer by day, PCNC 1100 owner Vesa Silegren revs things up a bit on the weekends. Performance racing enthusiast and self-taught machinist, when Silegren isn’t out on the course in his Honda CRX, he’s back home in his Chattanooga, Tennessee based shop SV Technologies, LLC.

Read More...

Best Practices for Preventing Collet Slip

Making Sense out of Tool Pull out Greg mentioned last week that we were putting the finishing touches on a report about collet slip. Why? It just always bugged us when we heard about it, as its been our strong belief that with a properly maintained system, pull out shouldn't happen. Its never been an issue in our shop in Waunakee, and it wasn't like we had some secret techniques we did here nobody else knows about. We just use common sense - keep tools clean and occasionally lubricate the drawbar. The fact is, with enough force, you can pull a tool out of a collet. But how much does it take? We designed our test to measure static pullout force of a tool from a TTS (modified R8) collet, and looked at a number of scenarios - not so much as a way to identify the absolute best method, but as a clear demonstration of how not to do things. [nggallery id=27] The test results validate what we always knew - if you properly prepare the mating surfaces and properly maintain (lubricate) the drawbar assembly, it takes alot - much more than the machine can actually pull up with. You're going to stall the spindle before the tool pulls out. You can read the entire report here, including a discussion of collets, test procedures, and data interpretation. Or you can skip ahead to the punchline and read the best practices recommendations below:

Read More...
1 of 1