Fast Prototypes for Fast Motorcycles

The world of manufacturing and fabrication is incredibly broad and fast-moving. It gets even faster in the world of custom cars and motorcycles. Scott Phillips works full time at a manufacturing facility with industrial CNC machines, but then he comes home and creates an array of custom parts. He's used his PCNC 1100 to make unique parts, brackets, and harnesses for a local motorcycle company, and he's done some improvising along the way with indexing and various forms of prototyping. With the mill in his garage, he can tackle prototyping projects faster than in the larger industrial shop.

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Maker Uses PCNC 1100s for Small Production and Development

Jim Anderson has been a journeyman machinist in Canada for more than 26 years, and he’s built everything from racing motorcycles to hydrogen fuel cells. Parts big and tiny, Anderson has seen a lot as a fabricator. With his array of building knowledge and his two PCNC 1100s, Anderson runs a prototype development machine shop, Anderson Prototypes.

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Tormach PCNC 1100 Helps Pneumatics Maker Compress Turn-Around Time

The custom engineering group at global pneumatic cylinder and valve producer Aventics concentrates on small runs and one-off requests for customers. The company builds a variety of products ranging from 10- to 12-bore cylinders to fiberglass tube cylinders and their valves, all the way to very small medical valves. Four years ago, when faced with rising costs and extended lead times for prototypes, Aventics brought in a Tormach PCNC 1100 mill to speed up prototyping and custom part development services for their customers at the model shop in their USA headquarters in Lexington, KY.

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From Prototype to Improving Lives: PCNC in the Medical Device Industry

Lukas Eiserman, owner and president of Eisertech, LLC—manufacturer of spinal implants and surgical instruments—uses PCNC as a core part of his business. What started as prototypes in Eiserman's home garage are now improving the quality of lives across the United States.

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Bevel Gears from Andrew Johnston

Received these project photos in the inbox a few weeks back and just now getting around to posting them.  Andrew lives "across the pond" in England and is a model engineering enthusiast.  He cut out these bevel gears with his Tormach PCNC 1100.  From Andrew:

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Our new toy, and a PCNC Lathe update

Apologies for the fat-finger submission last week. The "publish" and "preview" buttons are really close together in our Wordpress blog software:) Anyways, here's a few things that we've been up to in the lately. PGC (Personal Gantry Crane) First, our newest toy in the Tormach Shop - a portable 2000 lbs. gantry crane. Perfect for lifting the machine onto the stand, or a rotating 4th axis on to the PCNC table. I think it will fit in most garages as well. We've talked about getting one for a while, and it didn't disappoint. This one is an aluminum frame with large locking casters and a really nice made trolley. [nggallery id = 78] Progress on the Tormach Lathe Here are the lathe castings for the first prototypes of our slant bed CNC lathe project. These are now being built up at the factory and we expect to see the first prototypes in the fall. Steady progress, albeit somewhat slower than we had initially hoped for. [nggallery id = 79] Farewell to the Stirlings Finally, we've had a lot of fun making these Stirling Engines in our CNC Fundamentals Workshop over that last two years. The class last week had some of the best ones yet, like this one built by Kenny from TN. We Tach'd it at around 200RPM. As anybody who's played around with one of these coffee cup engines knows, they can be real finicky to get running, but Kenny had his cranking away the on the very first spin - call us impressed! Alas, this is a swan song for the Stirling project - after having almost 200 students build these during the class, we've decided to retire the Stirling project for the moment and will be building a very cool dial indicator holder in the future. This new project has some challenging parts and I think it will be a great teaching tool.

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