Turning With Your Mill - This Accessory Adds Turning to Your 770 or 1100

Have you ever wanted to add a lathe to your shop, but just didn’t have the room?

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How to Crash Your CNC Mill (Responsibly)

Mistakes Happen: Turning Student Crashes into Teachable Moments with Your CNC Mill

College freshman are immersed in new experiences at the start of the fall semester – their first time away from home, shopping on a budget, and, many times, their first time coming face to face with a CNC machine. We’ve all seen them. Their hands shake terrified they’re going to break something. So – why not let them? Just like other parts of their first-year experience, freshmen are going to learn the limits of CNC machining by going a little too fast, pushing a little too far. In a controlled environment with you watching them crash a CNC machine, this can help them gain that level of confidence they’re going to need as they learn the theory of CNC milling and turning. Just like cars, some CNC machines crash better than others, and here’s a guide to not busting your budget as students learn to machine, the hard way. 

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Cutting Threads with Your Mill

[youtube]2DoLF0L2Sa0[/youtube] Cutting threads is an important element of machining. Even if you aren’t into making your own, custom-sized threads, it still helps to know how to create them. We’ve seen customers get pretty creative with their machines and cutting methods, but with a Tormach mill, there are three main ways to cut threads.

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Tool Centerline Tolerances for Turning: Expert Techniques

Every machinist knows things work a whole lot better when turning if you can get your tool tip right on the centerline. During a trip to Tormach to test their CNC lathe before I got one years ago, I saw this first hand. I “eyeballed” a tool tip to center and made an OD turning pass. The cut was fine, but the finish seemed poor. So, we set the tool on centerline using the ruler trick:

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Know Your Cutting Tools: Lathe Tooling Designations

[youtube]Wp09EXLa4xw[/youtube] Whether you’re new to the world of turning or you’ve been using a lathe for years, it’s important to know your tools and the best way to use them. Lathe tooling designations are there to help, but they can be just as confusing as the tools themselves. [wpdm_package id='13034'] Every lathe tool has an inscribed or printed designation. This system just looks like a bunch of random digits and letters, unless you know what you’re looking at. Each letter and number in the tooling designation is a reference to various features of your tools or inserts – things like insert shape, hand of the tool, and the insert inscribe circle. Read: 3 Things to Remember Before You Start Turning All of these numbers and letters can be a bit confusing, so Tormach has a document that charts out all the different designations within the uniform system. Check out the official document. Use this info to make sure you pick out the best tools for your lathe jobs and make your turning even better!

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3 Things to Remember Before You Start Turning

If you’re already using a mill, a natural extension of your shop would be to add turning capabilities with a lathe. CNC milling and CNC lathe work are quite similar, but there are some glaring differences that are easy to miss if you’re new to turning.

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