Something Fast Has Arrived from Tormach

High Speed Spindle Cutting Logo IMG_0547Our new high-speed spindle kit (PN 35178) is now available to ship. This new spindle is provided as a retrofit kit for the PCNC 1100 – increasing the machine’s capabilities with spindle speeds as fast as 24,000 RPM.

In the past, we’ve sold a speeder (PN 31350) and a Kress companion spindle kit (PN 31890). While these accessories are still valuable, our high-speed spindle adds a new dimension to fast milling.

The Kress is designed for quick installation and low-power engraving, but does not have the ability to programmatically control spindle speed.

The speeder is capable of reaching 30,000 RPM (intermittent) and is compatible with both the PCNC 1100 and PCNC 770, as well as other mills with a Bridgeport-style quill. While the speeder lacks torque when compared to the new high-speed spindle, it is very simple to install.

The new high-speed spindle is intended to better utilize the full capabilities of our PCNC 1100 mill. While our previous higher-speed accessories were designed to provide finishing and engraving capabilities, the new spindle does all of the above with more torque and rigidity behind the tool.

High Speed Spindle Cutting Logo IMG_0643_1The high speed spindle cartridge contains an integral, water-cooled AC induction motor and is retrofitted into the PCNC 1100’s housing. The high speed spindle connects to the mill’s VFD using our Motor Quick Change Kit (PN 35167). Once installed, it’s just a matter of swapping VFD parameters using the included programming stick, powering up the machine, and selecting the new high-speed spindle type in the PathPilot interface. The high-speed spindle is not compatible with Tormach’s ATC system or TTS tooling, but it does use standard ER 20 collets.

A high-speed spindle-equipped PCNC 1100 provides the power required for quickly roughing high surface speed materials (such as aluminum) and the speed required for detailed contouring or finishing operations using small tools – all without sacrificing rigidity.

Check out the High-Speed Spindle Kit

What are you planning to do with these new speed capabilities?

Matthew Berggruen

Matt has a degree in engineering mechanics from the University of Wisconsin – Madison. He has been a project engineer with Tormach since 2014, and while also helping to spearhead new product developments, he contributes to the technical side of the Milling Around blog.

Matthew Berggruen

7 thoughts on “Something Fast Has Arrived from Tormach

  • Avatar
    06/22/2015 at 3:15 pm
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    This is a very nice and long awaited addition to the pcnc, huge improvement in MRR. Is there a plan to introduce an hss capable of holding an industry standard balanced holder?

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    06/22/2015 at 3:56 pm
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    Not compatible with TTS? That seems to be a rather serious drawback. What about the power draw bar? I guess that makes it easy for me to decide against this option (it’s okay, I’m spending enough as it is!).

  • Avatar
    06/22/2015 at 4:02 pm
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    So, being fairly inexperienced at machining, what’s the main improvement to the high-speed spindle? Faster feed rates?

  • Avatar
    06/22/2015 at 4:28 pm
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    Very exciting. 20 minutes to change over (according to the FAQ) is reasonable, I can live with that.

    Rick M: This is mainly for small tools that want to run at high speeds for things like finishing a mold (which is my application). With a minimum of 10K RPM, this isn’t your every day spindle. As for not being compatible with TTS — at 24K RPM everything needs to be well balanced or vibration will be a severe problem. R8 tooling (from anybody) just isn’t going to get you there.

  • Avatar
    06/22/2015 at 4:34 pm
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    There are a lot of benefits to having a high speed spindle. The biggest is the higher material removal rate and ability to hit the recommended surface footage for tools, which is very helpful for smaller tools. You’ll be able to cut faster with no significant load increase, surface finish, especially for 3D toolpaths will be greatly improved along with many other things.

    There are some downsides, mostly due to the use in a smaller machine. I do agree that lack of tts and simplified tool changing is a big drawback.

  • Chris Fox
    06/22/2015 at 4:34 pm
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    Thanks for reading, cyclons.

    To answer you question, we have no immediate plans to do so.

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